Showing posts with label gut microbiome. Show all posts
Showing posts with label gut microbiome. Show all posts

Wednesday, November 4, 2020

New Paper Reveals Insights into Bacteria that Live on Your Skin and in Your Gut

What do MEBO (metabolic body odor), PATM ("People are Allergic to ME" condition) and TMAU (trimethylaminuria) have in common - beside the obvious:  airborne substances that make people feel uncomfortable?  New paper published in JMIR Dermatology - Cutaneous Bacteria in the Gut Microbiome as Biomarkers of Systemic Malodor and PATM Conditions - demonstrates: it's microorganisms that live on the skin and can be also present in the gut. The results of a clinical trial reported in this paper showed that the same microbes can modulate severity of odor or allergic reactions in others independently of genetics and trimethylamine metabolism. 

MEBO paper in JMIR Dermatology

Researchers long suspected that there was a link between gut and skin health. Recent studies have confirmed it for a number of inflammatory skin diseases - such as psoriasis, rosacea, acne and atopic dermatitis. Microbes have been also suggested as targets for treating TMAU, a disorder that causes the body to constantly emit foul odor - from the skin, the mouth and the nose - via skin or fecal microbiome transplantation, antibiotics and probiotics. However, existing treatments are too broad, can lead to other health problems and lack understanding of precise targets and mechanisms. 

The paper shows that MEBO and PATM conditions don't always arise because of the decrease in microbial diversity. About half of the people might be lacking in microbial richness, but another half has too many different bacterial species to handle. 

The figure shows results of 22 study volunteers that were able to observe both flare-ups and improvements in their condition. The Y axis shows changes in microbial diversity vs abundances of selected bacterial species (X axis) for 12 female and 10 male participants. The arrows are labeled with 3 or 4 digits - the last digits of MEBO ID. Beginning of the arrow shows participants' microbial diversity and proportion of skin microbes in the gut during flare-ups, the end of the arrow points to improvements. As this figure shows, the only exceptions to the conclusion that the fewer cutaneous bacteria in the gut, the fewer skin emanations were 1214, 1287 and 1307. All of them observed very minor if not negligible (and easy to misinterpret) improvement of their condition (flare-ups happening from “all the time” to “most of the time”). 1214 was seen by a professional dermatologist, who concluded that a diagnosis of bromhidrosis didn’t seem warranted. 1307 had undergone a Botox procedure to treat hyperhidrosis, but was still experiencing symptoms (and, from our results, large fluctuations in odorous skin bacteria). 1287 did not report any skin odors and noted only halitosis. 

Read the paper to learn more and stay tuned for more details as they develop.


REFERENCE


Gabashvili IS  Cutaneous Bacteria in the Gut Microbiome as Biomarkers of Systemic Malodor and People Are Allergic to Me (PATM) Conditions: Insights From a Virtually Conducted Clinical Trial
JMIR Dermatol 2020;3(1):e10508
DOI: 10.2196/10508